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The 5:2 Diet

So we are into February and believe it or not many of us have dropped off our healthy heating or fitness regime but panic not we have been looking at some of the diets that people are raving about right now.

We have seen a huge amount of press about the nutri-bullet which is a great way to supplement your diet and add some superfoods and vitamins but we would never advise just juicing. Juice diets are very popular but many who see the full effects use them to boost their current diet or as a short-term detox.

The best way to live a healthy and active lifestyle is to simply eat a good balanced and varied diet.

Diet And Exercise Sign Shows Weight Loss Advice

This week we are looking at the 5:2 diet which allows you to eat what you like for 5 days and moderate your intake for another two. If this is done in a sensible way and you aren’t gorging on chocolate cake, crisps, bread and cheese etc for the five days then in theory this is just a way of regulating your calories for two days so will work.

The practice of fasting has been around for years, with tests carried out to uncover the potential effects as early as the 1940s. However, the dawn of 2013 ushered in a new spin on a practice that had more commonly been associated with religious rituals or even political protests. The intermittent fast, a weight loss wonder (with some other potential but as yet unproven health benefits) was snapped up by the UK dieting community who, feeling the bulge after Christmas 2012, were told they could eat what they wanted for the majority of the week and still lose weight.

The fasting for weight loss phenomenon was actually set in motion in August 2012, when the BBC broadcast a Horizon episode called ‘Eat Fast and Live Longer’. Doctor and journalist Michael Mosley presented the diet du jour as ”genuinely revolutionary” and as a result, published ‘the fast diet’ book in January 2013.

A month after Mosley’s book was published, former BBC journalist, Kate Harrison released her version titled ‘The 5:2 diet book’ The recommendations in both books vary slightly, though the general principles of the diet remain the same.

The simplicity of the diet and the fact you can eat pretty much what you like five days a week, are key to its popularity. Dieters are recommended to consume a ‘normal’ number of calories five days a week and then, for two, non-consecutive days, eat just 25% of their usual calorie total – 500 calories for women and 600 for men.

There are no restrictions on the types of food you can eat and it is suggested that women can expect to lose about a 1lb a week on the diet with men losing about the same if not a little more.

Here at i-motion gym in Rotherham we believe diet and exercise are the winning combo – Let us know you experiences – Have you tried it – did it work for you?

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